Finasteride and Mesotherapy – Is There a Link?

by:

UK

You have probably heard of mesotherapy time and again — it is a relatively new kind of cellulite treatment that is enjoying a rising popularity in the medical world today. Mesotherapy has been around for a while in Europe and South America, but it is only making its way into dermatology clinics in the United States. But today, there are questions about links between finasteride and mesotherapy.

Finasteride is a synthetic antiandrogen that is primarily used in the medical world to combat androgenic alopecia — better known to the rest of us as balding, or hair loss. Alopecia occurs in both men and women, although men seem to experience it much more readily as they approach their 40’s. So what does finasteride have to do with mesotherapy?

Mesotherapy is a procedure that treats cellulite by injecting a cocktail of vitamins, minerals, medications, and amino acids under the skin, especially in trouble spots. The cocktail is meant to attack fat cells under the skin, either killing them or making them release their fat contents harmlessly into the bloodstream, to be expelled by natural means.

While mesotherapy is not formally accepted into the medical world yet (owing to the lack of studies and hard evidence that it works for everyone), many cellulite sufferers agree that it does work for them, especially when getting rid of that last bit of stubborn cellulite. It does not seem to matter that most specialists in the cellulite treatment profession are quick to dismiss mesotherapy as nothing but “hype.” But today, it seems that mesotherapy has found its way into baldness treatment, as well.

A mesotherapist administers the treatment cocktail using a syringe, a special “mesotherapy gun,” or some other device with a needle. This lets the therapist penetrate only deep enough into the skin to inject the mixture, causing little to no pain and discomfort for the patient. This is now also being seen as a good way to administer finasteride to baldness sufferers.

Before mesotherapy made its point in the dermatology world, finasteride was usually taken orally. It was one of two approved treatments for alopecia and male pattern baldness, the other being minoxidil. It was important to keep taking finasteride regularly because the baldness problem would worsen when most patients stopped taking it.

This is where mesotherapy is coming in. It is being suggested that finasteride may be more effective in treating baldness when injected directly to trouble spots, just like how the treatment of cellulite trouble spots goes. Therapists are finding ways to create finasteride cocktails that can be injected directly into a patients crown or hairline to help regrow hair or at least stop baldness from worsening.

This procedure may also become a preferred way to treat baldness in women as well. Oral finasteride has been known to cause certain complications in pregnant and lactating women, but mesotherapy poses the possibility of bypassing this risk.

The technology is not there yet, but studies are continually being done to make this new treatment a possibility. If the link between finasteride and mesotherapy is established, perhaps it will open the doors to even better treatments of other common dermatological conditions as well.

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